Silent Hives

New Yorker

The Pennsylvania beekeeper Dave Hackenberg was one of the first to draw attention to the problem of Colony Collapse Disorder, or CCD, and, as a result, he became a celebrity, at least in apian circles. I interviewed Hackenberg in the spring of 2007, …

Silent Hives

Bee die-off reason found?

Worcester Telegram

T&G Staff Photos/TOM RETTIG

But when they checked them again in late December 2010 and January 2011, they found that 15 of the 16 pesticide-injected beehives were empty, a hallmark of the colony collapse disorder of beehives that has mystified beekeepers and scientists for the …

Bee die-off reason found?

Imidacloprid, A Major Factor in Colony Collapse Disorder

SciTech Daily

The researchers believe the increase in Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) is directly related to the use of imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid introduced in the 1990s, and have run studies aimed at replicating how imidacloprid may have caused the …

Imidacloprid, A Major Factor in Colony Collapse Disorder

Posted in Web

Colony Collapse Disorder in bees triggered not just by pesticides, but also by GMO high-fructose corn syrup

Prison Planet.com

Jonathan Benson Natural News April 19, 2012. Studies linking neonicotinoid pesticides to Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), a condition in which entire bee colonies suddenly disappear or die, have been gaining national attention in recent …

Colony Collapse Disorder in bees triggered not just by pesticides, but also by GMO high-fructose corn syrup

Posted in Web

Oregon’s bees holding their own against colony collapse disorder as spring crops await prime bee time

OregonLive.com

Vince Vazza, left, and Jan Lohman prepare their hives for the cherry orchards near The Dalles.

And hovering in the background is colony collapse disorder, or CCD, which in the past six years caused hive losses of 30 to 90 percent. It’s as mysterious as it is deadly. Adult bees disappear from the hive, often leaving behind a live queen, …

Oregon’s bees holding their own against colony collapse disorder as spring crops await prime bee time